magenta
The economic downturn has coincided with my busiest time yet. Since the beginning of the year, I’ve been translating all hours of the day and even broke my rule of never working at the weekend, but in these uncertain times, I felt like I should make the most of the work available while the running is still good: I’m very aware that things could take a bad turn very quickly.
It’s the closest I’ve ever felt to “burning-out” and so when friends asked if we wanted to join them for a week’s holiday in Italy, I jumped at the chance of a much-needed break. If I carry on much longer, I’m convinced that the quality of my translations will suffer and I don’t want to disappoint my clients.
I was talking about Italy with a history teacher friend of mine, who is currently teaching the Italian unification to her pupils, and she told me the origins of the word “magenta”:

1860, in allusion to the Battle of Magenta, in Italy, where the French and Sardinians defeated the Austrians in 1859, because the brilliant crimson aniline dye was discovered shortly after the battle.

Dictionary.com

I’ll be back in just over a week, all rested and ready to translate again.

Magenta toner photo by verseguru